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Forum Home > General Discussion > MWK STUDENTS and INSTRUCTORS

Mike
Member
Posts: 73

 Dustin, Car, Steve, Mike,Boomer, Glen I know I am forgetting a few, you were all Instructors of mine we have talked about the IKKA, if you come to this site, Join, post some things, all of you have so much to give, more so, pass on some of the things we have discovered, remember the all night training sessions? the classes with students that went on for 8 to 10 hours straight, focus drill till we puked lol,every one with their steel plates? teaching 16 hours a day 6 days a week, Life at MWK and

Living at the dojo.....Oh ya.......I hope to see you all here..........


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June 5, 2010 at 12:42 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Steven Almeida
Member
Posts: 3

Boy do I remember those days !!! It was the best time of my life. The all night training classes, and even yes.... the puking too !! LOL. The time flys when you having fun, but it seemed like it didn't take long at all. Some of the best " second nature" came from those classes. When you train 20 straight hours on the theories and concepts of some of the techniques and how they break down and how they are applied, I wouldn't have traded them for the world. That is what is missing out of the "franchise" training that alot of the other shcools are missing.If you could bottle the intensity and dedication that those students had, the results would be endless.

June 15, 2010 at 12:29 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Nothing
Member
Posts: 6

I too was a student/teacher at Midwest Kenpo. Previously, I had studied at a few other schools since I was in gradeschool. I received a blue belt from another Kenpo school in the area. It was in 1992 that I found MWK through a friend, Jeff. The first time I walked in, I expected it to be like any other school's door that I walked through. I met Mike and he was very professional and showed me around the school and introduced me to some of his students. I watched some of his students practice and I was amazed because they were white belts and moved in a way that I had not seen before. What stuck out to me while watching them was there was no time called, it was not point sparring, but sparring to learn how to do the technique on someone while the opponent was moving or in a state of motion. It was very active/reactive.  I joined the school and I must say that it was life changing. I had to carry a certain GPA in high school, otherwise I was not allowed to partake in classes. Mike always emphazied education, in school and in the dojo, my parents also liked that a lot. After a few classes, I realized that I did not know as much as I thought I did. I began to move differently, in a way that I did not before. White belt was the begining belt, but it was not a quick transition from white to yellow nor from yellow to orange because there was much information to learn.  We had tests not only only on the techniques, but on the theories and concepts behind movements, strikes and stances. We had to carry a notebook with us write down what we had learned. I was very impressed with the training that I had received. After MWK closed, another friend/student/teacher went looking for other schools so that we could learn from someone else. We were both disappointed because it seemed that we knew more than the person who was going to teach us. I am not saying that as a inconsiderate or arrogant statement, the fact was that many of the schools seemed to be "franchise" schools and quickly wanted to sign us to a contract. After watching a few of the schools classes, we did decline. We came to the conclusion that Mike in a sense made it hard for someone else to teach us due to the fact the information that we had learned was very detailed and so much in depth that it was not just about techniques, it was about movement, stance, flow, motion, tools, physics, psychological, physiological elements, etc. Mike was the most amazing teacher I have met and look forward to meeting others in Kenpo who share the same dedication that he has to the art.

 

June 20, 2010 at 5:12 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Glen Daugherty
Member
Posts: 5

I remember MWK. 

 

It was the best time of my life working out from Am to late Pm and some times all night.

Sparring one on one, two on one and even four on one. What was great about MWK was Mike, he was there for us no matter what we needed, martial arts or otherwise. There was such an open minded policy on different martial arts disciplines, it tought us our only boundaries were our own minds and physical abilities.

June 22, 2010 at 2:27 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Mike
Member
Posts: 73

Brian Hurricane Hicks, Good to see you, as you can see I am still opinionated, but that's just me, Brian do some postings, and please keep in touch, I still see many of the mwk people, we are going to have BBQ at the house your welcome to attend, by the way, mwk will be opening out here,,,,,,,,

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July 23, 2010 at 1:47 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Brian
Member
Posts: 3

The time I spent learning Kenpo from Mike and Steve Almeida was truely golden and I still remember all of the lessons they have imparted and the total love for the art that they demonstrated. A lot of good people came to learn at MWK and Mike treated them all like family. I am very glad to heard of MWK reopening and hope that it will be a complete success. Good luck !

July 28, 2010 at 2:26 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Mike
Member
Posts: 73

Thanks Brian, As a teacher, and as a friend, I received so much more from my students then I ever gave, watching them grow, seeing them discover new things and giving me the chance to share in the things that I love the most, words seem small compared to the memories and the feeling that I get when I think about MWK, if it was not for all of you.......Thank you

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July 29, 2010 at 1:22 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Mike
Member
Posts: 73

Dan Horvath, it was great talking to you, it has been way to long, I am glad that you have decided to move ahead with your studys, its hard to beleive that 20 years has passed since you had your dojo, dan you were and are a great teacher, friend and martial artist,,,,looking foward to hooking up

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October 2, 2010 at 6:52 AM Flag Quote & Reply

1 wandering ronin
Member
Posts: 3

Mike:

Thank you for your kind words....Before Mike opened his studio, Mike and I befriended each other and after I opened my studio, I gave him a key for his own private studies....Ironicly, after I closed mine, Mike continued the legecy of hard, tough training....

Out of all of the Martial Artist that I have ever met and out of ALL of the schools I have ever went too, Mike was the standard that I compared all too....Mike is a very humble genuine MASTER that dedicated his life in the persuit of Knowledge and in the spirit of empathy towards his fellow man.....Cleveland, Ohio was a very unique melting pot of many great instructors....Althought Mike thought I am and was a good instructor, I always thought that Mike was the Master....A master in the Tiger ( in his fierce fighting ability), A master in his Technique and moreover, a true Master in dicipline.....


Like the Colt .45 Pistol, all other firearms are judged by the stopping power of this fine weapon.....That my friends is how I compare Mike.....Mike is the standard by which to look at other schools and instructors.....Ko-tucki-ty was the way to become a warrior, repitition, focus, speed and power developed mastery of technique; proper stance  and position insured success in the execution of the technique....

I bow humbly to you, Master Mike for this Wandering Ronin is ready to continue my quest in being the Master that you have become........


October 2, 2010 at 2:48 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Mike
Member
Posts: 73

Dan, LOL over stated,,,,one thing I am not is a Master, if anything I am more of a beginner today then ever, over there years one thing I have learned is things change, abilities, concepts, insights,,,etc.

what you do at 20 is almost impossible at 55, unless you have great health insurance.

but thats what is great about the arts is the change, leave ego out of it, and you can study and be challenged forever,

that poses a question...what is a master of the arts? someone who is really good? how is it possible for someone to master something that constantly changes? for someone to have all the answers, we are not talking woodworking or something that is based on constants, the arts change they all ways have and will....


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October 2, 2010 at 3:39 PM Flag Quote & Reply

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